New Jenn-Air Appliances coming to Arizona Wholesale

Jenn-Air Introduces New Cooking Modules

New Jenn-Air Product Category Soon at Arizona Wholesale

Jenn-Air-Modules

At the recent AD (Architectural Digest) show in New York City, Jenn-Air introduced a new line of 15″ wide modular cooking products including:

Induction module

Induction-Module

Induction Module

By converting the cookware into the heat source, induction technology offers fast, efficient and highly responsive cooking power. The Jenn-AirTM induction module features a flexible element to accommodate various sized cookware and glass touch electronic controls.

Induction Wok module

This unique modular induction wok features a concave design to cradle a round-bottom wok. With an element that delivers up to 3,600 watts and the high efficiency of induction technology, it provides powerful and effective wok cooking. Additional features include pan detection and glass touch controls.

Both the cooktop and wok modules feature pan detection, which detects cookware before enabling an element, and automatically turns off the element 30 seconds after cookware is removed. Both a Jenn-Air round-bottom and flat bottom wok will be offered as accessories for the induction modules.

Chrome Infused Griddle module

Chrome-Infused-Griddle

Chrome Infused Griddle

Originally available on its Pro-StyleⓇ​ soon be available as a 15” module. Its chrome infused surface combined with 1,800 watts allows for faster cooking while radiating less heat in the kitchen. In addition to its durability, the chrome surface is easy to clean and maintains its sleek, shiny appearance. A white LED backlit knob indicates when the griddle is on.

Gas single module

Featuring the most powerful BTU output offered by Jenn-Air, the 20,000 BTU commercial-style, dualring burner on this module can sear, create a rapid boil or achieve high heat for wok cooking while also achieving an ultra-low 700 BTUs, gentle enough to melt chocolate or butter without scorching.

Gas double module

This 2-burner modular gas cooktop features two elegant, brass 15,000 BTU burners including a dual-stacked PowerBurner that provides two levels of flame to handle a range of cooking methods, from high-powered searing and boiling to gentle simmering. An included wok ring fits securely on top of the grates to accommodate a wok.

Gas-double-module

Gas Double Module

4″ Downdraft strip

Featuring a sleek 4” width design, a 350 CFM blower capacity and tap-touch backlit controls, this downdraft vent works with any cooktop module to keep the air clear without interrupting kitchen sight lines. For those in spaces that preclude access to exterior venting, the vent is convertible to duct-free ventilation that uses a filter to efficiently capture smoke, grease and moisture.

For more photos of the new Jenn-Air modules click our Houzz link below and view the “Coming Soon” photos in Projects:

Arizona Wholesale HOUZZ

Trade professionals should contact their Arizona Wholesale representative at the relevant number below. Otherwise, consult your builder, contractor, or design professional. Arizona Wholesale is Arizona's leading source for Jenn-Air, or other major appliances, floor coverings, water filtration, window treatments, and other building products.

*text from Jenn-Air in Italics


Appliances, floor coverings, window treatments, and more

Arizona Wholesale

Phoenix 602 258-7901, Scottsdale 480 596-0092, Tucson 520 795-4663

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Kitchen Remodel Ideas

Kitchen remodels are a big commitment. Be careful of trends that will go out of style, or are too buyer specific. A helpful tip is to look at trends that increase the value of your life and home. The following tips have staying power, but also address convenience, lifestyle needs and enjoyment!

  1. Transitional design – Contemporary designs can often be cold while keeping a busy kitchen clean and uncluttered is sometimes a challenge. You can overcome this challenge by using transitional design, which combines both traditional and contemporary elements while allowing you to use the old and new and eliminant kitschy fads!

  2. You can’t go wrong with white. Try layering white by using white walls, white cabinets, white tile backsplashes, and white appliances. Stainless appliances have reached the masses and no longer fosters those chic exclusive items. Plus, white is so much easier to keep clean than stainless. White never goes out of style!

  3. Want some color, try neutral grays with pops of color – gray is close enough to white that you can use in all areas of the country by adding warmth with wood floors, or light and airy touches with pops of color. Just don’t overdue the color, a little goes a long way!

  4. Quartz countertops – Quartz has been rated the toughest material for countertops, it resists burns, cracking and scratches. Quartz comes in a variety of solid colors and the look of real Granite. Quartz beats natural stone in toughness, ease of cleaning and does NOT have to be sealed every year like Granite.

  5. Refrigeration – With today’s busy schedules, rethink your refrigeration needs. Add a wine cooler for the adults, add a juice/water fridge for the children. If you love to cook and take it seriously, add a counter height produce fridge to your island. Add refrigeration where you need it!

  6. LED lighting – Kitchen LED lighting is a wonderful way to add lighting to your prep area while providing esthetically pleasing touches to your kitchen. Add rope or cove lights to cabinets, under cabinets, and recessed canned lighting. LED lighting creates ambiance, and comes in soft to bright white, and a multitude of colors. LED’s are extremely efficient, lasting five times longer than standard bulbs. They emit very little heat, so you can keep the lights on forever!

Retro Kitchen Design

The design style known by the name of “Retro” is comforting because it reflects on a simpler time. Almost everything you need is visually accessible. This is a good design choice for a single person or a couple. When cooking for only a few people there is no need to have a complicated chef’s kitchen. Find out how to create this type of design style in your own kitchen!

Two tone color choices were very popular in the typical 1940’s and 1950’s styled kitchens. Typically a bold color would have been paired with a lighter neutral. Popular bright colors for a retro kitchen are cherry red, robin’s egg blue, mint green and canary yellow. Cream or off-white was the most popular neutral paired with one of the bright colors, listed above.

Antique refrigerators are perfect for this space. It sets the tone for the design style. These appliances can be refurbished antiques. There are companies that make new refrigerators that look like the old models, but or updated technologically. Another antique appliance that will assist in pulling off this design look is a stove, oven or a combination unit. This can be either a stove or a cook top paired with a wall oven. It was popular to have wall ovens as well as stoves, during this time period.

Black and white “checker board” style flooring was the most popular floor type for this period. It is perfect because it will pair with any color choice you select. This can be easily pulled off by installing 12” x 12” black and white porcelain tile. Vinyl tiles in black and white can also pull this look off. The 12” x 12” is the best size to go with, when designing a retro look!

When shopping for counter tops, it is best to choose a material that is one solid color. The material choice really doesn’t matter, what does matter is that there is a lack of pattern on the counter top. We would suggest a black or gray granite, in either a glossy or honed finish.

Creating a retro kitchen is fun and nostalgic. If you are planning to have furniture such as a small dinette table or bar stools, keep the style specific to the time period. Steel or aluminum minimalist bar stools are a great choice. Even an acrylic dinette table will work in this setting.

Choosing a Built-In Refrigerator

Built-In Refrigerators at Arizona Wholesale

Types, Styles, and Look

In the early days of built-in refrigerators there were very few choices. Sub-Zero gets credit for creating this category in the mid-late fifties. It took a while for the category to grow into what it is today. At one point Sub-Zero was synonymous for built-in refrigerator, and even today they are clearly a market leader. However, many other brands now offer a variety of choices in built-in refrigeration. Here are a few:

Bosch, Dacor, Electrolux, Jenn-Air, KitchenAid, Miele, Monogram, and Thermador

Sub-Zero pioneered the traditional built-in refrigerator which, for our purposes, is a refrigerator with a cabinet depth no more than 24″. Early on the brand offered a choice of stainless steel fronts or models that would accept slide-in cabinet panel fronts to match adjacent cabinetry (overlay models).

Eventually, built-in refrigerators were developed that had hidden hinges and accepted cabinet panel fronts that were flush with adjacent cabinets. These refrigerators were fully-flush “integrated” refrigerators.

Sub-Zero-Fronts

Sub-Zero Fronts

Click below for a short discussion on integrated appliances from Houzz:

INTEGRATED APPLIANCES

Today, column refrigerators with cabinet panels have doors that go from bottom to top (no horizontal panel at the top), and when the doors are closed are truly not discernible from the adacent cabinets.

Columns

Columns

Configurations of built-ins includes side-by-side refrigerator/freezers, bottom freezer refrigrator/freezers, and separate column refrigerators, freezers, and wine coolers. In addition, some brands offer built-in under counter refrigerators and wine coolers; as well as under counter refrigerator and freezer drawers. The configurations for your kitchen are endless.

Click on the link below to review some of the choices in built-in refrigerators on our Houzz page:

Arizona Wholesale Houzz

For all your contract appliance, floor covering, window treatment, water systems, grills, and other builder-designer needs contact the professional at Arizona Wholesale.


Appliances, floor coverings, window treatments, and more

Arizona Wholesale

Phoenix 602 258-7901, Scottsdale 480 596-0092, Tucson 520 795-4663

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Saving Money on Luxury Appliances

Appliance Returns, Open Boxes, and Blemishes

Almost by definition, luxury appliances are expensive. It's hard to find a bargain when it comes to exclusive super-premium brands. High pricing seems like a badge of honor for some exclusive brands, and manufacturer pricing policies such as MSRP and UMRP work to keep market prices uniform. However, when appliance items are returned, get discontinued, or damaged, some really great appliance bargains can be found.

A few years ago, a local contractor, Michael Margolin, was searching for a bargain for his son, Simon, who was remodeling the kitchen in an older home in Hollywood Hills. It was a major project that Simon and his wife were undertaking. Even though it was a premier location, Simon and his wife had a limited budget. Michael knew that Arizona Wholesale carried luxury brands along with all the standard popular brands, that production builders use.

During Margolin's visit to Arizona Wholesale, inside sales associate Victor was able to outfit Michael with luxury appliances from Miele and Wolf that worked for Simon's new kitchen. The appliances were open stock with a variety of blemishes, scratches, or defects that meant that no buyer would be willing to pay full price. However, the damage and flaws were either located where they would not be visible, or they were repairable with some refinishing or new parts. Here's a photo of the Wolf Range model that Margolin was able to pick up at a bargain.

Of course, there are risks with buying scratch and dents. They're usually sold as is, and may not carry a full factory warranty. In addition, if you require a specific brand and model, your chances of finding the exact item you want are very slim. At Arizona Wholesale the experienced sales associates can guide you through the process and you get to decide, if this is right for you. In the Margolins' case, it worked out very well indeed. See photo below:

Margolin Remodel

Wolf Range - Miele Wine Unit

 

The finished remodeling project was so stunning that it was featured in a Houzz Kitchen of the Week. Click on the link below:

Bringing back glamour to a Hollywood Hills Home

The moral to this story is that if you find yourself in a bind and cannot get the appliances you need at the going price, visit Arizona Wholesale and ask about the closeouts, scratch and dents, and open products for extra savings.


Appliances, floor coverings, window treatments, and more

Arizona Wholesale

Phoenix 602 258-7901, Scottsdale 480 596-0092, Tucson 520 795-4663

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Kitchen Trends for 2017

There are some major changes coming to kitchen design. These changes are new and refreshing. Likely they will remain longer than a simple trend. Find out what is new in kitchen design and how to implement them into your kitchen!

Horizontal wood grain is huge for cabinetry. This technique is revitalizing traditional wood cabinetry. Most commonly the cabinet faces are flat panels. There is no recessing or molding details on this style of cabinet. Turning the wood grain on the horizontal actually makes the kitchen seem wider. Hardware does not need to be ornate or fancy. The most popular style of hardware is simple metal, horizontal pulls. One of the best features of installing this kind of cabinetry is that it can be paired with other types of wood. For instance if the cabinet grain is very prominent, pair a wood flooring that has a smaller visible grain. Also run the other kind of wood grain in a different direction, preferably vertical. This will create interest with a clean look!

Mixing in two kinds of cabinets is a wonderful way to add dimension and interest. In the photo you will notice the horizontal wood grain cabinets are paired with clean white cabinets, and some of them have frosted glass insert. In this case, three different materials were mixed to create an interesting cabinet design. The key to pulling this off is to keep the cabinet design simple. Again there is no raised panels or ornate moldings on the cabinet doors. Each different cabinet material is in the same flat panel design.
2017 is all about contrast. Contrast is the key to keeping a design looking fresh and interesting.

Monochromatic schemes can be great if done perfectly; which is very hard to pull off. Details get lost in a monochromatic setting and everything just sort of blends together. Creating contrast is one of the best ways to add interest and dimension. Details are noticed and appreciated when contrast comes into play!

If you are making some changes to your kitchen this year, consider the above read. These are not simply trends but good design ideas that will remain!

Kitchen Backsplashes

When you enter into any well-designed kitchen you’re most likely drawn to the beautiful hardwood cabinetry. Or perhaps it’s the gleaming stainless-steel appliances and the countertops. The backsplash area often goes unnoticed. Yes, the backsplash area is the tiled or wall of silver that runs above the countertop and stove area.

A backsplash is a great way to quickly add style and personality to your kitchen. However, most homeowners who install a backsplash stick to the same monochrome material. Selecting the right type of backsplash can liven up your kitchen design.

Why Install A Backsplash

Installing a backsplash behind your countertop, stove and sink can serve as a protection. Between cooking and washing dishes your walls can easily become damaged from food, debris and water. A backsplash will prevent your walls from being damaged by these materials. In addition, they are easy to clean which saves you time.

Backsplash Designs

Kitchen backsplashes are available in an array of styles and designs. You can opt for a traditional or a modern design. Tile backsplashes come in a variety of colors and can be arranged by a professional designer to create a unique look. If you’re interested in creating a piece of artwork that will instantly attract your guests you can implement accent tiles or dark wood in your design scheme.

Help! I Spilled a Bottle of Olive Oil on My Granite Counter!

A lot of people mistakenly believe that because they are made of stone and are being used in the kitchen, that granite counters are impervious to most stains and spills. Unfortunately, many of the granites on the market are extremely porous and can absorb liquids right into them if they are allowed to sit on the stone long enough. If this occurs with water, it will eventually evaporate, leaving only a temporary darkening of the stone. If, however, oil was absorbed by the stone, the darkened area won’t lighten up again on its own. To remove the stain, you need to create a poultice to get it back out.

What Is a Poultice?

A poultice is any kind of substance that can absorb or remove a stain from inside the stone. You can purchase poultices from many stone fabricators or sellers, or you can make your own. Spread on top of the oil stain, a poultice will pull the oil from within the stone up to the surface, where it can be wiped away.
The key is to ensure that you use the type of poultice for the type of stain you have, and that you only use materials on your stone that won’t harm or etch the surface.

Homemade Oil Poultice

Try this quick and dirty homemade poultice for oil stains on your granite counter to help pull the oil out.

• 1 cup unbleached flour
• Dawn dishwashing liquid that does not contain any lemon

Slowly mix the dishwashing liquid into the flour until you get a paste the consistency of peanut butter. Spread the poultice over the oil stain and stretch a piece of plastic wrap over it. The Dawn will help cut and eliminate the oil while the flour helps to pull it up and out of the stone. Let it sit for one hour, then wash the area with a PH neutral stone cleanser.

Once you’ve removed the stain, seal your counter with an impregnating, silicone based sealer to help prevent new stains from forming.

What’s the Process of Getting a Granite Counter?

Granite countertops remain one of the more popular choices for kitchen counters, especially with the latest trends moving toward natural materials and colors in the kitchen. Regardless of what type of stone you end up choosing, or where you get it from, the process of choosing, templating, and installing the counter remains about the same.

Stone Selection

Your first stop in the granite countertop process is at the stone yard where you’ll view the actual slabs. Because granite is a natural stone, each slab will be slightly different in color and pattern, so you can choose the exact piece you want for your kitchen. The slab you choose will be tagged and set aside for you once your template is complete.

Templating

The templating portion of the process determines the final cost of your counter, and helps the fabricators make it to order. Thin strips of wood are laid along the edges or outline of your current counter or cabinets. The wood is glued together until it resembles the size and shape of your counter. The templater will also mark on the wood where the sink will be installed and any other particulars.

At this time, you should have the sink and faucet on hand so that the templates that come with these can be handed to the fabricator at the same time. Any special edging or treatment of the stone will be discussed now as well.

Fabrication

Once the template is made, fabrication can begin. This involves taking the slab you selected and cutting and polishing it to fit the shape of the wooden template that was made at your home. Your sink and faucet templates will also be used to cut the holes into the counter for these to be installed.

Installation

Your old counter will be removed and the new counter brought in. It will be attached to your cabinets with adhesives, and if the counter you’ve chosen is weak or thin, a plywood support may be installed beneath it.

At this time, your plumber will install your sink to the counter, clamping it in place for about 24 hours until the pipes and faucet can be hooked up. Your fabricator may also seal your counter for you, as well as fill any seams with a color matched epoxy to finish the job.

Painting Techniques for Tuscan Kitchens

Tuscan design is one of the most popular styles for kitchens. The rich, warm colors combined with cool accents and natural materials make Tuscan design one of the most inviting – and longest lasting – design styles. And while you’ve probably already considered painting the walls of your Tuscan kitchen in one of the rich, warm hues that are so popular there, consider taking it a step further and using a faux painting technique as well. There are a few different painting techniques that work particularly well in Tuscan kitchens, highlighting the natural materials used elsewhere in the room and adding to the depth and charm of the space.

Color Washing

Color washing involves layering a glaze of color on top of a second color to get a deeper look on the walls. This is achieved by painting your walls the base color, which is generally the lighter of the two. Once the walls are dry, thin your second, darker color with about five parts glaze. Now wipe the glaze onto the wall with a soft cloth or rag. Use a random movement, bunching and twisting the rag as you go to get a varied effect across the wall.

Sponging

Sponge painting involves layering a darker color over a lighter one with a piece of sea sponge to give the whole wall an interesting texture. As with color washing you’ll want to paint your wall your base color first, then thin out your top color with glaze. Dip differently sized pieces of sponge into the glaze and tap or press them onto the wall. Vary the size and shape of the sponge, as well as the amount of glaze on it and the amount of pressure you use to get a lot of interesting depth and texture to the wall.

Dry Brushing

Dry brushing can add a little more of a subtle look to the walls. This technique involves layering one color of paint over the other, but instead of using a thinned, wet glaze, you use a brush that has been dipped into the paint and then wiped off. The remaining paint on the brush just skims the wall, adding a thin wash of color that allows the base color to show through.