Prepare Appliances for Your Vacation

5 Steps to Prepare Your Appliances for Vacation

It's that time of year again. You're getting ready to take your vacation, but you haven't really thought about getIng your appliances ready for your extended absence. Here's a list of what you should do to make sure your appliances will not flood your house, spoil your food, or otherwise create havoc while you're away.

  1. Some appliances, such as your water heater or refrigerator, may have a Vacation Mode. If so, utilize this handy setting. It makes some internal energy saving adjustments.

  2. Run an empty load through your washer and dishwasher. Use whatever cleaner you normally use for cleaning that appliance such as Affresh or LemiShine. For vacations of 2 weeks or longer, prevent odor build up by leaving the door or lid on the washer and dishwasher open while you're away. Pour 1/2 cup of vinegar into the bottom of the dishwasher. This will keep the dishwasher free from odor, and the rubber seal in the bottom of the dishwasher moist.

  3. Turn off the water supply line to refrigerator, washing machine, and dishwasher. (I'm paranoid about water leaks).

  4. For vacations that are more than just a long weekend, remove perishables from the refrigerator, and turn the icemaker off. That usually means just lifting the metal bar in the ice maker to its highest/off position. In some refrigerators only the ice bin is accessible, not the ice maker itself. For these models, there will be a separate on/off switch for the ice maker (see below example).

    Refrigerator-Icemaker

  5. Your refrigerator is going to be on while you're away, and it will use more electricity if it is empty. So, if you've removed most or all of the food from your refrigerator, fill a few empty plastic gallon jugs with water, and place them in the refrigerator.

*Most of the tips are for vacations of a week or longer. For those long 3 day week end trips, I'd just turn off the water lines and turn off the ice maker.

For questions about your specific appliance, check your use and care manual. For information about appliances, floor coverings, window treatments, and more home products consult your designer or builder, then call Arizona Wholesale Supply for an appointment with one of our consultants.


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Arizona Wholesale

Phoenix 602 258-7901, Scottsdale 480 596-0092, Tucson 520 795-4663

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Detergent Pod Warnings

Dishwasher and Laundry Detergent Alert

Arizona Wholesale Supply

We've had several blogs over the last four years on the merits of using detergent pods for laundry or dishwasher loads. There are reasons for choosing the pods, and we've argued both against the detergent pods and in favor of them.

Detergent-Pod

We've also consistently complained that the companies selling detergent pods shouldn't make them in bright colors that might easily be confused with candy by children.

Safety Warning – Laundry Detergent Pods – May 2012

Detergent Pods a Safety Hazard

Now, it appears that this issue is continuing to evolve. In fact, Consumer Reports has withdrawn their support for detergent pods because of the danger to children.

The problem with laundry detergent pods.

According to the American Association of Poison Control Centers, just in the first 4 months of 2016, nearly four thousand kids five and under have been victimized by exposure to detergent pods.

“Some children who have gotten the product in their mouths have had excessive vomiting, wheezing and gasping. Some get very sleepy. Some have had breathing problems serious enough to need a ventilator to help them breathe. There have also been reports of corneal abrasions (scratches to the eyes) when the detergent gets into a child’s eyes.” – AAPCC

In addition, the National Capital Poison Center has stated, “Biting into laundry detergent pods can cause serious injury or even death.”

Unfortunately, the detergent manufacturers have not addressed the pods candy-like appearance, and have instead decided to make the detergent containers more difficult to open.

So, use your discretion, but CR and others are now recommending against the detergent pods, at least in any households with children.

As always, for all your appliances, floor coverings, window treatments and more work with your design professional, or builder, and call Arizona Wholesale Supply for an appointment with one of our associates.


Appliances, floor coverings, window treatments, and more

Arizona Wholesale

Phoenix 602 258-7901, Scottsdale 480 596-0092, Tucson 520 795-4663

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Dishwasher Detergent: Pods or Powder?

The great debate for getting dishes clean

Should you use dishwasher detergent powder or pods

Dishwasher-Pods

I’ve done some research on this subject and have expressed my opinion in the past. That’s all about to change.

Reasons to use dishwasher detergent powder:

  1. It’s less expensive to use powder than it is to use dishwasher pods.
  2. Users can control the amount of detergent based on the size of the dishwasher load. It makes sense that if the dishwasher is only half full, you wouldn’t want to use the same amount of detergent, but the pods are one size fits all.
  3. When the detergent pods are dispensed from the soap dispenser they can easily fall behind a cup or dish where they won’t get the water spray that causes them to dissolve. Failure for dishwasher pods to dissolve is probably the number one complaint that users make regarding pods.

Reasons to use dishwasher detergent pods:

  1. The pods are very convenient: no measuring, and no spillage.
  2. Detergent pods are dispensed from the dishwasher just like the powder is, but unlike powder, the pods dissolve over time providing a continuous supply of detergent through the cycle for cleaner dishes.
  3. Recommended not just by the detergent companies, but also by the major dishwasher manufacturers, AND Consumers’ Union.

The Appliance Guru Recommendation

In the past, I’ve held the view that while pods are money makers for the detergent company, the powder gives the user more flexibility and costs less. However, I cannot escape the reality that the pods seem to do a better job. After conversations with users, personal observations, and reviewing the testing of CU, I have become convinced that pods are the better choice over dishwasher detergent powder.

HOWEVER, I am adamantly opposed to the pods being manufactured in multi-colored packets that small children perceive as candy. I know that parents should keep chemicals away from their kids, but I still can’t see why detergent manufacturers have to make their detergent appear to be edible.

P.S. Chemicals are one small part of getting clean dishes. Call or visit the experts at Arizona Wholesale Supply for advice on the best dishwashers to choose for your new home or kitchen remodel.


For more information call or visit the experts at Arizona Wholesale Supply .

Appliances, floor coverings, window treatments, and more

Arizona Wholesale

Phoenix 602 258-7901, Scottsdale 480 596-0092, Tucson 520 795-4663

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Detergent Pods a Safety Hazard?

Liquid Detergent Pods Look Like Candy

Detergent-Pods

Liquid detergents are increasingly being packaged in see through bit-sized pods that look like candy, and they are being ingested by children.

We originally wrote here in 2012 that this was becoming a safety issue.

Safety Warning – Laundry Detergent Pods

It appears that this danger has only become worse. Despite considerable publicity, concerns from Federal safety agencies, Consumer Reports, and poison control centers, over 17,000 reports of children ingesting the chemicals in the packets were reported in 2012-2013. Children can become sick in a matter of minutes after ingesting the contents of these packets.

As a result, legislation was introduced yesterday to force detergent companies to follow stricter requirements with respect to single serve liquid detergent packs. The bill was introduced by Sen. Dick Durbin from Illinois who stated that parents need to do their part in keeping the packets away from children, but that companies can also do more to make their products safer by,

“making the design and color of packets less appealing to children, strengthening the water-soluble outer layer, and adding proper warning labels are common-sense protections for consumers similar to those for countless other household products,” he said in a statement. “We can still have convenience without sacrificing safety for children and families.”

Co-sponsor of the bill, Congresswoman Jackie Speier from California said,

“Toxic, concentrated detergent should not look like candy. It is irresponsible to market a product that is so unsafe to children.”

We recognize that these detergent pods are a great convenience, though we're unsure why they need to be made to look like candy. Regardless, we urge those who have children around to please be careful to keep these products away from the reach of children.


Remodeling or Home Improvement project? Call or visit the experts at Arizona Wholesale Supply .

Appliances, floor coverings, window treatments, and more

Arizona Wholesale

Phoenix 602 258-7901, Scottsdale 480 596-0092, Tucson 520 795-4663

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Dishwasher Detergents, Rinse Aids, and Additives

Advice for New Dishwasher Owners

What to Use to Get Clean Dishes

dishwasher-pod

Here's a video that we've made with some recommendations on detergent brands, rinse aids, and additives to help you avoid glasses that look like this:

dirty-glass

Just click below to go to the video:


For more information call or visit the experts at Arizona Wholesale Supply .

Appliances, floor coverings, window treatments, and more

Arizona Wholesale

Phoenix 602 258-7901, Scottsdale 480 596-0092, Tucson 520 795-4663

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Dishes not getting clean? It may not be the fault of the dishwasher.

Have you noticed that your dishes aren’t getting as clean as they used to? Before you blame the dishwashwer, it’s entirely possible that the cause of your problem is the detergent. In the last few years states have begun banning phosphates in detergents for ecological reasons. The upshot is that detergent companies have removed the phosphates from detergents to the detriment of their cleaning performance.

If you suspect this may be the problem and you want to find a way to get your phosphates back, there are a couple of solutions. One possiblility is to purchase commercial dishwasher detergent from a restaurant supply house such as this Cascade Professional Line dishwasher detergent. It is perfectly legal and contains the phosphates that were removed from the domestic product.

20120610-125058.jpg

Pictured below is the Bubble Bandit brand dishwasher detergent which you may need to order online (www.bubblebandit.com). It is a commercial-grade dishwasher for home use and has 8.7% phosphate content.

20120610-125006.jpg

Finally, the dishwasher additive Finish contains phosphates and is also legal for use.

20120610-125037.jpg

Though environmental concerns may dissuade you from seeking to avoid the phosphate ban, the algae bloom which phosphates were supposedly causing, have been deemed “essentially harmless” by a more recent scientific study.

Stay tuned. We’ll cover general dishwasher features and performance in an upcoming blog post.