3 Prong to 4 Prong Dryer or Range Cord

Proper Install of Your Dryer or Range Cord

It's not unusual for home owners to confront problems when they find that the 4 prong plug for their new electric range or dryer won't fit the 3 hole receptacle in the wall. Alternatively, they may find that the 4 hole wall receptacle in their new house won't match up with the 3 prong plug on their old electric dryer or range.

This mismatch occurs because in the mid 1990's homes had 3 wire systems that had two “hot” wires (red and black) and a single neutral/ground wire. In 1996, the National Electrical Code was updated to require new homes to be built with a safer 4 wire configuration with separate ground and neutral wires.

So today, your new 4 prong electric dryer cord won't fit in an older 3 prong wall plug. The solution is simple. You will need to switch to a 3 prong dryer cord. The same is true for mismatched range cord and wall receptacle. Here are three important points to keep in mind:

  1. If a cord's plug, and the wall receptacle don't match, you must change the cord, not the wall receptacle.

  2. Dryer hookups and range hookups are configured differently. A dryer cord plug won't work in a range wall receptacle, nor will a range cord plug fit a dryer receptacle.

  3. The current 4 wire system has red and black wires just as before, plus a white neutral wire, and a green or bare wire for the ground.

The move to a 4 wire system was an important safety improvement. However, you can tell from above, that the conversion from a 3 prong vs 4 prong configuration on the plugs can be a bit of a hassle. Even after 20 years, this still can be an issue if you have or move into an older house.

Now that you know what needs to be done, you should also know that range and dryer cords do not come attached with a new appliance. If you are installing yourself, you'll need to know how to attach the cord to the appliance. Below is a link to a Whirlpool video demonstrating how the 4 wire cords are to be hooked up:

How to install a 4 wire supply cord to your dryer

Of course, when Arizona Wholesale Supply is delivering and installing your new appliances we'll bring the correct cord with us!


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Follow-up on new GFCI code requirement

Remodeling a Kitchen? Think about updating GFCI outlets.

This is an update of a blog I wrote last year regarding new NEC requirements for GFCI plugs as of June 29, 2015.

New Rules on GFCI Receptacles

We purchased an older home recently, and did major remodeling including the kitchen. We had some electrical issues in the kitchen, so I called in an electrician to analyze and fix the problem. Not just an electrician, this fellow was an electrical inspector who did some odd jobs on weekends.

GFCI-Outlet

New GFCI Outlet

He addressed and fixed the main problem I had which related to the lack of adequate power in my kitchen. While he was there, I asked him to install new GFCI outlets in my kitchen. We had a brief discussion regarding the new code, and he informed me that GFCI plugs should not be used for the refrigerator. THIS IS WRONG, and it is widely misunderstood by the trade. The new NEC code which went into effect June 29, 2015 requires the new self-monitoring GFCI's in the kitchen, but does make an exception for a refrigerator in the kitchen. That does not mean that the GFCI is not a good idea for the refrigerator, but an exception is granted where needed (see below). Here's what you should know:

At one time, twenty years or more ago, refrigerators and freezers had large compressors, that had large power requirements when they turned on, a “surge” if you will. Old model refrigerators provided a lot of cooling very quickly, then turned off for a long time, and then kicked back on when the refrigerator warmed up. A refrigerator or freezer kicking on might unnecessarily trigger the circuit breaker and disconnect power to the refrigerator. This could result in food loss or spoilage. However, today's refrigerators have smaller compressors that run all the time at variable speeds, eliminating the “surge” and keeping temperatures even. Refrigerators today pose little risk of tripping a circuit breaker. In fact, if they do trip the circuit breaker, it is likely there is an underlying cause that needs to be addressed.

The real lesson for you is that if you have any electrical work done in your kitchen or baths, it is a good idea to update your electrical receptacles with new outlets that are compliant to the latest NEC requirements.


For more information call or visit the experts at Arizona Wholesale Supply .

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New Rules on GFCI Receptacles

Heads Up: Builders and Contractors

GFCI rules changing again on June 29th, 2015

UL 943 Changes

The new rule requires that GFCI receptacles manufactured on or after June 29, 2015 must have:

  1. An auto-monitoring function that will allow for periodic automatic testing (self-test) of the GFCI device and its ability to respond to a ground fault. If a problem is detected the GFCI will disconnect power to anything connected to it or indicate that there is a problem using visual or audible means.
  2. Provisions to ensure that any receptacle type GFCI that contains separate line and load terminals, and that is powered through its load terminals, shall not reset and supply power to its receptacle face or line terminals if miswired. This applies both during its initial installation and after reinstallation following a correctly wired installation. If the device is provided with special instructions for removal and reinstallation, the instructions shall be followed during testing.

Provision 1 is self-explanatory. From June 29th, 2015 forward, manufacturers of GFCI receptacles, will need to build receptacles that meet the new UL criteria. That is, the receptacle itself must have the ability to verify that it will disconnect power in the event of a ground fault, and provide a warning either visibly or audibly.

Provision 2 seems a bit more confusing, but essentially it requires that if the GFCI receptacle is mis-wired, it cannot simply be reset. The receptacle must be removed, and replaced or removed and re-installed following the procedure specified by the GFCI manufacturer. In the past, some GFCI receptacles could simply be reset without necessarily correcting the cause of the malfunction.

The good news in all this is that the regulation effective date applies to the manufacturer. Existing inventory manufactured before June 29, 2015 may still be used, but GFCI receptacles manufactured on or after June 29, 2015 must comply to the new provisions of the regulation.

So, builders and contractors need to be aware of this new regulation and understand that over the coming months they'll begin to see the new GFCI receptacles show up in the supply chain.


For more information call or visit the experts at Arizona Wholesale Supply .

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Phoenix 602 258-7901, Scottsdale 480 596-0092, Tucson 520 795-4663

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Getting to know your new dishwasher

New Dishwasher? What Now?

3 Steps to get you going with your new dishwasher.

Dishwasher

You finally have the new dishwasher you’ve been wanting for so long! You’re just itching to load it full of dirty dishes, and let the new dishwasher do its magic. Well, not just yet. Let’s take a few minutes to familiarize ourselves with this magic machine. Here’s a list of three steps that will get you headed in the right direction:

  1. Check the exterior. Is the dishwasher level? Does the door open and close without rubbing or hitting anything? Make sure that the dishwasher is fastened in and doesn’t fall forward when you open the door. The electrical should be connected to a grounded outlet or junction box, and the water line connected to the water supply and turned on. The dishwasher drain line must also be connected at your disposer or sink. The water inlet and drain fittings should be tight and the hoses should have no kinks. All OK? Let’s move on to step 2.

  2. Check the interior. Have all the packing materials, and manuals been removed? Remove any pieces of styrofoam wedged against the dishwasher racks that keep them from rolling back and forth during shipping. Now, roll the racks back and forth to make sure there is nothing impeding their movement. If everything looks good inside and out, we can move on to step 3.

  3. Find your use and care manual. Somewhere inside your dishwasher, or in an adjacent drawer there should be a plastic bag with the warranty, install instructions, a use and care manual, and various other treasures. Before throwing all this in a box with the rest of your papers, remove the use and care manual from the bag. Well, maybe you’re not going to read the entire manual, but at a minimum you should familiarize yourself with the dishwasher operation and controls…please!

If you want to find out even more on general dishwasher use and care, we’ve produced a new video covering some of the essentials. It’s only about 3 minutes long, and should get you going in the right direction. Watch below:

 

Thanks for watching! For more information feel free to contact Arizona Wholesale Supply Company, Arizona’s leading builder supplier since 1944.

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Kitchen Remodeling Tip 2: GFCI Circuits

GFCI Circuits in your Kitchen

Our last blog on kitchen remodeling covered electrical issues that might occur.

Kitchen Remodeling Tip: Check Electrical Needs

In my case, I had an older house with appliances (refrigerator and built-in micro-hood) each wired on circuits with other electrical outlets rather than on separate circuits. It was not practical to add separate circuits for these two appliances, but we were able to move the microwave to a different circuit with lower total power demand which resolved any power shortage issues. Also, It was not necessary to to move the refrigerator to another circuit.

Now, we’re going to cover the issues regarding GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) in an older house.

GFCI

GFCI-Outlet

GFCI Outlet

Originally, the NEC code required GFCI receptacles only in the garage and bathrooms. Over the years, the code has been regularly amended, to include kitchens, and laundry areas. What is a GFCI receptacle?

GFCI stands for Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter. In brief, a GFCI receptacle monitors electricity passing through any plugged in device for an imbalance. The GFCI receptacle breaks the circuit if there is more than a 5 milliamp difference between the electrical current entering and the current leaving. The result is that any device plugged into a GFCI receptacle with a short or a wiring issue will be disconnected in about .025 seconds.

In my particular instance, for some reason we had no GFCI receptacles in the house. So I had the electrician add GFCI receptacles to the bathrooms and the kitchen areas so we’d be up to code. However, I’ve just learned that the latest revision to the code now has added a GFCI requirement for dishwashers. It’s easy to get frustrated over changing regulations, but when you consider that spending a few bucks on having the proper electrical outlet might save a life, it makes sense to be protected from electrical hazards.

For more information on GFCI or other remodeling or building issues contact your remodeling professional or homebuilder.


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Kitchen Remodeling Tip: Check Electrical Needs

Updating your New Kitchen

Review Electrical Requirements in your New Kitchen

Remodeling a kitchen can be fun and exciting, but it can also be frustrating, and costly. Don't make it more frustrating and costly than necessary by failing to examine your electrical needs.

When lighting or appliances are moved or require additional power, it's typical to have some electrical work done. However, even if you're just updating an existing kitchen with new cabinets, countertops, etc. you may be find yourself in need of some electrical work. Here is an example that I ran into recently with a kitchen remodel.

Microwave-Install

The house was in a nice neighborhood, and had a great floor plan that perfectly fit our needs. But it was an older house (approx. 30 years), so we had to completely gut and redo the inside. Even though we weren't adding any additional appliances, I had some concern that the power available in the kitchen might be insufficient. Specifically, I knew that the manufacturer of the microwave hood recommended a separate circuit, and I doubted that this kitchen was wired with a separate circuit for the microwave hood. Nevertheless, everything seemed to work well in our new kitchen….until Thanksgiving.

All of our kitchen appliances and lights were running at full power along with crockpots, etc. when the kitchen lights started blinking like a Christmas tree. Curiously, even the lights on the chandelier in the nearby dining started blinking. Then a breaker kicked off and the microwave as well as some lights shut down. We turned off a few things, and flipped the breaker back on. Thanksgiving was saved, but we knew that some electrical work was in our future.

We had an electrician come out, and together we discovered that the microwave hood was on a circuit with some lights and plugs in another room. Unfortunately, there was no inexpensive way to pull a separate wire from the breaker box to the microwave hood. However, the electrician was able to switch the microwave to a different circuit with a lower total power requirement. In addition, he suggested we use low power LED bulbs for the lighting on that circuit. The result was that with LED bulbs and the microwave together, even if all lights AND the microwave were on at the same time, there would be no chance of overloading the circuit. Easter here we come!

Next up: GFCI circuits in your kitchen.

New Home or Remodel – Arizona Wholesale Supply is ready with appliances, flooring, window coverings, and much more. Check with your builder or designer today.


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Arizona Wholesale

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Buying a Built-In Coffee Machine

3 Tips when choosing a built-in coffee maker

Wolf-coffee-maker

Wolf Coffee Maker


1. Location, Location, Location

Where are you going to install the coffee maker? In most cases, your new coffee maker will go in an upper wall cabinet, often above or next to an oven. However, if your searching for a location and can't seem to find one, here's just one idea that might work:

The space at the end of the kitchen counter (above) is a perfect fit for a built-in coffee maker. The cabinet is white, and the matching side panels for the front were cut to fit for the coffee maker.

2. Dimensions

Most coffee machines have a 24″ width. They'll fit perfectly in a 24″ cabinet, but will need a filler for 27″ or 30″ wide cabinets. Some manufacturers provide matching stainless steel fillers, or you may wish to install matching cabinet fillers.

3. Utilities (Electrical and Plumbing)

If you don't conveniently have electrical available at the back of your coffee maker, you'll need to consult with your designer or electrician to get electrical service behind the coffee machine. Also, some coffee machines need to be connected to plumbing, so if you don't have a water supply line convenient, your plumber will need to run a line to the back of your coffee machine. However, many coffee makers have internal tanks that you can fill with no need for external plumbing. Miele has a coffee maker that can be externally plumbed or used with an included water tank.

While these are clearly important considerations for choosing a built-in coffee maker, there's more to think about including a host of features and prices that vary from brand to brand. Over the last decade the industry has changed dramatically. Where there used to be only a couple of built-in coffee maker brands, now nearly all of the higher end brands have their own coffee maker models.

Here are some of the coffee machine brands you'll find available at Arizona Wholesale Supply.

Bosch
Brew Express
Dacor
Electrolux
Gaggenau
Jenn-Air
Miele
Thermador
Wolf
Viking

Be sure to consult an appliance specialist for help in selecting your new coffee maker. The experts at Arizona Wholesale Supply are well-trained in the key brands as well as many of the specialty brands. Call or visit today.


For more information call or visit the experts at Arizona Wholesale Supply .

Appliances, floor coverings, window treatments, and more

Arizona Wholesale

Phoenix 602 258-7901, Scottsdale 480 596-0092, Tucson 520 795-4663

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