How Long do Appliances Last?

When Should I Replace My Appliances?

It's complicated

Many years ago, I used to carry around a chart from AHAM (Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers) which itemized the expected life spans of various appliances: washing machines 15 years, ranges 20 years, etc. I've long ago disposed of this, but I did find this current version. Here is a look at today's appliance lifespans from Consumer Reports:

Dishwasher – 9 years
Dryer (electric and gas) – 13 years
Microwave oven – 9 years
Range electric – 13 years
Range gas – 15 years
Refrigerator – 13 years
Washing machine – 10 years

We all know that the life expectancy of appliances is not what it used to be, but let's not confuse quality with durability. Today's washing machines use less detergent, energy and water than their predecessors. They are more gentle on clothes, and get them cleaner than ever before, but have a life expectancy of only 10 years, compared to 15 years or longer from grandma's Maytag.

Today, manufacturers seem to be on a never ending quest to reduce costs, and as consumers we shop until we drop to get save every hard earned dollar we can on appliances. Moreover, we don't seem to care if our kids inherit the family refrigerator, and we are quick to get rid of a broken appliance to avoid paying a stiff repair bill.

I recently read that in upscale neighborhoods it is not uncommon for kitchens to be remodeled about every 10 years, and that includes new appliances. So, even though appliances don't last as long as they used to, we tend not to even keep them for as long as they last.

The truth is that we don't expect our appliances to last as long as they used to…but we do expect that they have the latest features and look great in our house. I once asked a customer if she had a brand preference for her new washer. She replied that it didn't make a difference as long as the washer was red.

So, don't feel guilty about replacing your 15 year old agitator style topload washing machine with a shiny new front loader. The old machine is at the end of it's life, and the new one could actually pay for itself in energy savings….plus, it's red!

To get more information on appliances, floor coverings, and more be sure to consult your design professional or builder, and make an appointment with the experts at Arizona Wholesale Supply.


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KitchenAid Built-In Oven with Microwave and STEAM Option

Who Thought a Microwave could Steam?

KitchenAid Convection Oven that Microwaves, Steams, and More

The 220v. power allows this oven to cook with a 1600 watt convection element, giving it plenty power for thermal cooking, and has an added 900 watt broil element for grilling. But why stop there when you can add true variable microwave energy for even faster combined thermal/microwave cooking? But wait! There's more! This is not your Grandma's oven. It's a real convection oven that bakes, roasts, and broils, but does so much more. By adding variable (inverter) microwave power and sensor technology to traditional radiant and convection heating, you'll get amazing results.

We all know that there's been a lot of excitement these days about steam cooking and the healthy benefits that accompany this cooking method. Well, this oven has a sensor steam cycle built-in. KitchenAid even includes a special steam cooking vessel for best results.

Finally , I LOVE the optional crisper accessory that works like a charm for hors 'd oeuvres, bacon, and etc.

There are two companion models of this oven. The KMBP100ESS will fit in a standard 30″ wall cabinet, while the KMBP107ESS is designed for 27″ wide cabinets.

30″ Built In Microwave Oven with Convection Cooking
KMBP100ESS



Here are some of the factory specs and details:

PRODUCT DETAILS

Convection Cooking
Circulates heat around the oven cavity with a 1600-watt convection element that allows baking at temperatures up to 450° F.

EasyConvect™ Conversion System
Takes the guesswork out of convection cooking by ensuring exceptional results when experimenting with new recipes or familiar favorites.

Professionally-Inspired Design Including Handle, Badge, Graphics, Chrome Chamfer
A bold blend of professionally-inspired styling with sleek touches for the home. This stunning microwave oven features Satin Textured Handles, Precision Touch Controls, a Chrome Inlaid Frame, the KitchenAid® Badge and KitchenAid Brand Medallion.

Broil Element
Combines the high power and even coverage needed to achieve results similar to outdoor grilling results.

Sensor Steam Cycle with Steamer Container
A sensored microwave oven cycle that allows precise steaming based on the food type and doneness level selected. Includes a steamer container to help you get the best results.

1.4 cu. ft. Capacity
Provides large cooking capacity while complementing your convection oven.


For more information call or visit the experts at Arizona Wholesale Supply .

Appliances, floor coverings, window treatments, and more

Arizona Wholesale

Phoenix 602 258-7901, Scottsdale 480 596-0092, Tucson 520 795-4663

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Myths About Appliances

Researching Appliance Energy Claims

Major-Appliances

Do Appliances Use Significant Power when they're not running?

I like to do some research when I post blogs that make claims or contain data. Unfortunately, many online blogs and posts seem to mislead us rather than enlighten us. Recently, I came across a blog from an appliance “expert” (an appliance parts house), referring to myths about appliances. Here is the author's claim regarding one of the appliance myths he purports to expose:

MYTH

Appliances don't use power while in stand-by mode: FALSE. Almost all home appliances and electronics continue to consume power when in “stand-by”. Check out these stand-by power consumption rates:

  1. Microwave oven: up to 6 watts per hour
  2. Ranges: up to 4.1 watts per hour
  3. *Telephone: up to 5 watts per hour

In some cases, appliances in stand-by mode can consume as much as 15-30 watts per hour – that's a lot of power usage day after day, week after week.

Not so Fast

OK, let's assume that leaving all our appliances in “stand-by mode”, whatever that means, will consume as much as 15-30 watts per hour, BUT to say that “that's a lot of power usage…” doesn't ring true to me.

Let's do the math:

30 watts per hour = .03KWH (kilowatt hours)

Let's see how much it costs to keep our appliances in “standby mode” for a month.

.03KWH X 24 hours = .72 KWH per day X 30 days = 21.6 KWH per month. X $.12** per KWH = $2.59 per month.

Now, this estimate is at the very high end. Using the author's own data, this could be 15 watts rather than 30, making the cost per month under $1.30. I'm not happy that my “standby” appliances cost as much as a couple bucks a month to keep running, but I can live with it.

Conclusion

HE-Topload-Washer

Let's put all this in perspective. Your major appliances are going to cost you far more in energy costs (electric and/or gas) than $1.30 per month. If you really want to cut down on appliance energy costs, unplugging your microwave when it's not in use is quite trivial. It's also a pain to reset the clock each time you plug it back in. However, replacing an old agitator-type washing machine with a new high-efficiency washer will get you significant savings. Maybe as much as $130 a year according to Lifehacker.

* When did a telephone become an appliance?

** $.12 per KWH = national average cost of electricity. Electricity costs vary greatly across the country.


For more information call or visit the experts at Arizona Wholesale Supply .

Appliances, floor coverings, window treatments, and more

Arizona-Wholesale-Logo

Phoenix 602 258-7901, Scottsdale 480 596-0092, Tucson 520 795-4663

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Kitchen Remodeling Tip: Check Electrical Needs

Updating your New Kitchen

Review Electrical Requirements in your New Kitchen

Remodeling a kitchen can be fun and exciting, but it can also be frustrating, and costly. Don't make it more frustrating and costly than necessary by failing to examine your electrical needs.

When lighting or appliances are moved or require additional power, it's typical to have some electrical work done. However, even if you're just updating an existing kitchen with new cabinets, countertops, etc. you may be find yourself in need of some electrical work. Here is an example that I ran into recently with a kitchen remodel.

Microwave-Install

The house was in a nice neighborhood, and had a great floor plan that perfectly fit our needs. But it was an older house (approx. 30 years), so we had to completely gut and redo the inside. Even though we weren't adding any additional appliances, I had some concern that the power available in the kitchen might be insufficient. Specifically, I knew that the manufacturer of the microwave hood recommended a separate circuit, and I doubted that this kitchen was wired with a separate circuit for the microwave hood. Nevertheless, everything seemed to work well in our new kitchen….until Thanksgiving.

All of our kitchen appliances and lights were running at full power along with crockpots, etc. when the kitchen lights started blinking like a Christmas tree. Curiously, even the lights on the chandelier in the nearby dining started blinking. Then a breaker kicked off and the microwave as well as some lights shut down. We turned off a few things, and flipped the breaker back on. Thanksgiving was saved, but we knew that some electrical work was in our future.

We had an electrician come out, and together we discovered that the microwave hood was on a circuit with some lights and plugs in another room. Unfortunately, there was no inexpensive way to pull a separate wire from the breaker box to the microwave hood. However, the electrician was able to switch the microwave to a different circuit with a lower total power requirement. In addition, he suggested we use low power LED bulbs for the lighting on that circuit. The result was that with LED bulbs and the microwave together, even if all lights AND the microwave were on at the same time, there would be no chance of overloading the circuit. Easter here we come!

Next up: GFCI circuits in your kitchen.

New Home or Remodel – Arizona Wholesale Supply is ready with appliances, flooring, window coverings, and much more. Check with your builder or designer today.


Appliances, floor coverings, window treatments, and more

Arizona Wholesale

Phoenix 602 258-7901, Scottsdale 480 596-0092, Tucson 520 795-4663

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